Author Archives: Wendy

Jan. 11.

How soon can I check a pregnancy test?

Pregnancy tests are suggested for use only from the first day of your expected (missed) period.  A pregnancy test is normally only accurate 3-4 weeks after conception (normally at least 19 days after unprotected sex) or later, when the hormone hCG levels can be detected (which pregnancy tests measure).  The longer you wait, the more accurate the results. This is one reason for re-taking the test after a few days if you’re unsure (hCG levels will continue to rise over time if you are pregnant).

Jan. 11.

Can birth control pills interfere with pregnancy test results?

No.  However, if you are taking birth control you may not know exactly when to expect your period (and thus, might be unsure about when to do the test).  For reliable testing, use the pregnancy test at least 19 days after having unprotected sex.  Then, re-test again after a few days to be sure.

Jan. 11.

If I am pregnant, what are my options?

First and foremost, is to ensure that you are healthy.  Seek out medical attention from a doctor or other healthcare professional.  Next, you will need to decide if you want to take the pregnancy to full term.  This may be one of the most important decisions of your life, so do not make this decision lightly and give significant time and thought to it.

–      Try not to make a decision too quickly about your next step.
–      Consider all the alternatives available to you.  This may include taking the baby to full term, adoption if you cannot provide for the child, or other options.
–      We have included multiple resources online for you to turn to for additional information, but be sure to get input from those who are important in your life (boyfriend, spouse, parents, doctor, etc.).
–         Unexpected pregnancies occur every day to millions of women – so remember that you are not alone.

Jan. 11.

If I am pregnant, what do I tell the father?

Legally, the father has a right to know that he is in fact a father, and should be responsible for the child in terms of child support, if taken to full term.  Note: legally the father does not have a right to be involved in your decision to maintain or not to maintain the pregnancy to full term.  Overall, interactions you decide to have with the father is a very personal issue that you must decide

Jan. 11.

How effective is emergency contraception?

These “morning-after” products (such as brands: Plan B One-Step or Next Choice), when used as directed (within 72 hours of unprotected sex) can significantly reduce the chance of pregnancy.  They are about 85 percent effective.

– Note that in the US these are available without a prescription.

Jan. 11.

Can I get pregnant from having sex once?

Even a single unprotected sex act can result in pregnancy.  However, your odds of becoming pregnant from a single encounter depends upon your menstrual cycle.  You are unlikely to become pregnant if you are not near your time of ovulation (which is about 12-16 days before your next menstrual cycle).  If you are within this timeframe (12-16 days before your next cycle, or near it) your chances are much higher.

Jan. 11.

How effective is the “fertility calendar method” of contraception?

A woman’s cycle begins when eggs are released into the fallopian tube, where they await fertilization.  This happens during a time period between 12-16 days before your next menstrual period – when you are most-fertile.  A “fertility calendar” tracks that date each month, showing which days of the month you are most-likely to become pregnant.  As a method of contraception, this is most-effective when a woman is quite regular with her periods and carefully tracks days of the month. Remember that sperm can live in the vagina for up to a week, so having sex prior to your ovulation can also result in pregnancy.  The best advice is using contraception such as condoms which do not require this tracking and can prevent pregnancy as well as sexually-transmitted diseases.

Jan. 11.

Could I be pregnant with a period?

No, by definition you cannot have a period while you are pregnant.  However, you CAN have light vaginal bleeding or spotting.  Many women report having some bleeding during the first few months of pregnancy, and often they assume this is their normal period (and that they are not pregnant). Don’t be fooled by the bleeding. If you notice light bleeding or spotting that is lighter in flow and different in color (perhaps pink or brown) rather than your normal period, this might be a sign of pregnancy. If you’ve had unprotected sex in the past month, take a home pregnancy test to be sure, or see your physician.

Jan. 11.

I’m not pregnant (according to pregnancy test), so why did I miss my period?

Missed periods can have many different causes, besides pregnancy these include: significant changes in weight, stress, illness, medications (e.g., birth control), changes in schedule, heavy exercise, illegal substances, breast feeding, other medical conditions, etc.

Jan. 11.

How do I use a home pregnancy test for the best results?

Home pregnancy tests should be used only on or after the first day of your expected (missed) period.  Follow the directions provided precisely.  Warning: drinking an abundance of liquor prior to using the test may “water down” the urine, so only test when urinating as normal;  early morning urine is said to be best for testing (as is it most concentrated).