Now What?

Q. What do these pregnancy symptoms mean?

A. Having a missed period, spotting or abnormal period, abdominal pain or cramping, breast changes (tender, tingling, swollen), feeling tired, dizziness, nausea/queasiness, vomiting, extra sensitivities (food, smells), frequent urination – are all normal pregnancy symptoms. If you think you are pregnant, treat yourself as if you are pregnant and see your doctor.

 

Q. When did I get pregnant?

A. Your ovulation period is normally 12-16 days before your next menstrual period, so you can use this to calculate approximately when you became pregnant. You are normally fertile and able to become pregnant if you had sex up to a week before and a few days after that date.

 

Q. How many weeks pregnant am I?

A. A home pregnancy test cannot tell you how far along your pregnancy is, only whether you are pregnant or not. Your ovulation period is normally 12-16 days before your next menstrual period; you can work backwards from this date to determine the date of when you conceived. Also, a blood test conducted in a doctor’s office can measure hCG levels more precisely, which can help your doctor determine how far along you are.

 


Q. If I am pregnant, what do I tell the father?

A. Legally, the father has a right to know that he is in fact a father, and should be responsible for the child in terms of child support, if taken to full term. Note: legally the father does not have a right to be involved in your decision to maintain or not to maintain the pregnancy to full term. Overall, interactions you decide to have with the father is a very personal issue that you must decide.

 

Q. What if I’m not sure who is the father?

A. Your ovulation period is normally 12-16 days before your next menstrual period, so you can use this to calculate approximately when you became pregnant. You probably had sex with the father within a week prior to this, or a few days after.

  • A physician can help you determine exactly how far along your pregnancy is, which should help you make this determination. If you are still unclear, a DNA test may be necessary to determine who is the father. Remember that this news may also be significant to the father as it is to you.

 

Q. If I am pregnant, what are my options?

A. First and foremost, is to ensure that you are healthy. Seek out medical attention from a doctor or other healthcare professional. Next, you will need to decide if you want to take the pregnancy to full term. This may be one of the most important decisions of your life, so do not make this decision lightly and give significant time and thought to it.

  • Try not to make a decision too quickly about your next step.
  • Consider all the alternatives available to you. This may include taking the baby to full term, adoption if you cannot provide for the child, or other alternatives you should discuss with your doctor.
  • We have included multiple resources online for you to turn to for additional information, but be sure to get input from those who are important in your life (boyfriend, spouse, parents, doctor, etc.).
  • Unexpected pregnancies occur every day to millions of women – so remember that you are not alone.

 

Q. If I am pregnant, how do I do tell my parents?

A. If you are in fact pregnant, a frank and honest discussion with the important people in your life may be necessary. If that’s your parents, then this is the time to talk. Also, reach out to a doctor or other healthcare professional who you can talk to.

 

Q. How do I decide if I want to go to full term or not?

A. This is an extremely personal and important decision, so best not to take it lightly or make a decision too quickly. Talk to those who you are closest to, and take your time in making this important decision.

 

Q. Who can help me figure this out?

A. Look to the people who are most-important in your life (boyfriend, spouse, parents, friends, spiritual advisor, doctor, etc.). Don’t feel all alone in making decisions about your pregnancy – turn to others to get support wherever you can find it. Remember that you should never feel forced into making any decisions – take your time and make your own decisions, but certainly get input from others who can help you.

 

Q. Where can I go for help?

A. This varies from person to person – obviously, the first place to turn is to those who love you. Beyond this, a spiritual advisor, doctor, and other healthcare professionals can give you a different perspective. Talk to those around you. We have also tried to offer various web links here for your reference.

 

http://youroptions.com

http://www.webmd.com

http://www.plannedparenthood.org

http://www.nrlc.org/help

http://www.askthedoctor.com

http://www.babycenter.com/pregnancy

 

This information is not meant as a substitute for professional medical advice.

 


Need more information? Check out the web links we’ve provided above, post a question on our Forum page, or ask your healthcare professional.



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